Succeeding in a Future with Multiple Identity Solutions

Succeeding in a Future with Multiple Identity Solutions

Future-proofing and advancing data-driven marketing strategies can feel daunting with the endless streams of articles, whitepapers, and opinions on the 80+ identity solutions available in the marketplace.  Alliant is in a unique position to bring together industry leaders and embark on a candid discussion about actionable steps that brands can take today to work towards a privacy-safe, collaborative future.

In July of 2021 we hosted such a conversation in partnership with Digiday, hosting Travis Clinger, Senior Vice President of Addressability and Ecosystem at LiveRamp and David Danziger, Vice President of Data Partnerships at The Trade Desk.

A few highlights from the conversations include:

How Google’s extension on sunsetting 3rd party cookies really impacts the timeline for future proofing.

Predictions on what a reality of multiple interoperable ID solutions working in unison might look like.

Alliant’s agnostic and flexible approach to identity enables the best possible support for our Members.

For a deeper look at the many ways you can start building your own strategy around multiple ID solutions, watch the full webinar:

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Matt Frattaroli, VP Digital Partnerships

With over a decade of experience in adtech and eCommerce, Matt leads Alliant’s digital team in expanding strategic partnerships with the industry’s largest digital platforms and agencies. Matt’s professional roots are deep in the digital marketing space, having built multiple eCommerce and MarTech companies, including ChoiceStream. In 2015 Matt was recognized by Digiday as a Signal Award Finalist in Data Management and Marketing, for his work with consumer polling validation.

 

Why Data Co-ops May be a Path Forward for Identity Solutions

Why Data Co-ops May be a Path Forward for Identity Solutions

Originally published by WARC in April, this piece is more relevant than ever with Alliant’s recent announcement of its support of Unified ID 2.0. We hope Members are actively considering how to connect to these ID solutions and how Alliant and your DataHub membership can help.
Lately it feels as if the entire digital advertising landscape shifts every time one of Google’s product leads dashes off an early morning blog post. The latest has the industry fretting, with Google’s proclamation in March that it will not build or support alternative identifiers once Chrome stops supporting third-party cookies sometime next year . Meanwhile, Apple said last week that its IDFA (Identifier for Advertisers) changes – which make it opt-in – are kicking in this week, causing even more consternation.

With every big tech announcement from Google, Apple or Facebook, the industry looks at what may be lost, and rightfully so. However, brands and agencies also need to take a close look at what they’ll still have going forward. Walls may grow higher, identifiers may go, but brands will always have access to their first-party data, and that is incredibly valuable.

They may take our Unified ID but they will never take our 1st party data!

Having first-party data sounds great, but the challenge is what brands do with that data. To ensure that a first-party data asset not only enables brands to work with changing platforms, but also is less dependent on any one platform or solution, they must enhance and connect their first-party data to a collaborative environment. Joining a data cooperative can offer such connectivity, providing access to complementary second-party data and analytics beyond a brand’s first-party asset. To understand the value of a data cooperative, it’s worth agreeing on a common definition of second-party data. Winterberry Group defines it as data that is shared in a dedicated environment with a clearly defined set of permissions and rights set between each of the parties and, most often, the third-party provider managing the environment.

Full disclosure, at Alliant we run a data co-op, which anonymizes and aggregates brands’ first- party data into a second-party data asset. In this process, similar to other data co-ops, a brand’s first-party data is first and foremost permissioned by the consumer, and then anonymized and stripped of personally identifiable information (PII) in a dedicated environment, protecting consumer data and each brand’s business information. The result is a privacy-compliant, stable, second-party asset maximized for analytics and enrichment capabilities.

Co-ops have been around for decades in the direct marketing world and have evolved to fuel advertising as brand dollars have flowed to the digital realm. While third-party data suppliers and aggregators took off in the online world, co-ops steadily remained a way for brands to maximize their first-party data intel across channels.

DMPs (data management platforms) and CDPs (customer data platforms) have grown in popularity over the years, yet neither has taken on a core business function like creating a unique second-party data set aggregated across multiple brands to complement a brand’s existing first-party data.

Given the inherent scale limitations of first-party data, the absolute requirement of privacy compliance and, most recently, Google and Apple’s decisions to kick identifiers to the curb, co-ops now have even more value than ever before.

Data co-ops have staying power

Launching in the early ’90s, data co-ops have proven their ability to adapt to industry shifts, including the explosion of digital media and the constantly changing world of compliance standards. Their greatest value going forward may be in aggregating properly permissioned PII, and then normalizing and anonymizing that data to make it usable. Beyond simply organizing and enriching data, this co-op data transformation creates a stable, analytic-oriented second- party data asset that fundamentally differentiates a co-op from a CDP and makes it an untapped tool in the marketer’s arsenal.

The co-op benefit

With an increase in digitally-native DTC brands, co-ops represent a collaborative way to turn digital signals and first-party insights into actionable data through partnership with other like-minded marketers. The concept of sharing first-party data, especially in the current climate, may be hard to swallow for many brands, and even a barrier to considering a data co-op all together. However, the possibility to safely enrich first-party data is a necessary step for brands and especially publishers.

While advertisers are obvious beneficiaries of co-op data, longtail publishers with limited first-party data will benefit from joining forces in a co-op setting to make the most of the little data they do have. Creating an ad network across publishers gives them more control in working closely with advertisers, instead of full defaulting to Google to handle their ad revenue.

Pooling data will also help manage the reduction in credible reach and targetable audiences that will happen in 2022 with the loss of the cookie. Collaborating across multiple publishers provides incremental reach to balance that issue. Connecting insights across brands and publishers allows advertisers to target another brand’s first-party data, modeled for their own brand’s offering, across the inventory from a publisher co-op partner. On paper, that sounds much more desirable than the limited identifiable universe that will come into play once Chrome stops supporting third-party cookies.

Unlocking value on advertising’s bleeding edge

Perhaps the greatest benefit of co-ops goes back to their origins serving direct mail marketers. Today, this gives them the ability to aggregate data across channels, helping to bring offline insights into the online world. This solves a number of issues by:

      • Providing valuable offline consumer behavior data as the amount of online behavioral data shrinks due to the loss of the cookie;
      • Creating a logical extension for offline brands to enter online efforts; and
      • Easily translating to offline marketing insights for omni-channel campaigns.

This last point is perhaps the most enticing when facing the future of advertising. First-party data and the collaboration within a co-op are huge assets within other walled gardens like Amazon, retail networks like Target, and of course in TV, where cord-cutting has accelerated due to the pandemic. These are emerging frontiers of advertising, where Google’s decisions are not going to have the same impact. As these become more valuable ways to engage with consumers in the very near future, brands that can use their first-party data, and co-op insights to target within these channels will be primed to seize the opportunity.

It’s critical for brands to grasp the implications of the potential loss of third-party insights, but it’s just as important that they understand why it matters where those insights come from. What’s more, advertisers need to understand where the loss of cookies matters and where it doesn’t.

Co-ops have survived and thrived, and their signals will remain reliable amid cookie deprecation and translate into new frontiers like CTV and retail networks.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Matt Frattaroli, VP Digital Partnerships

With over a decade of experience in adtech and eCommerce, Matt leads Alliant’s digital team in expanding strategic partnerships with the industry’s largest digital platforms and agencies. Matt’s professional roots are deep in the digital marketing space, having built multiple eCommerce and MarTech companies, including ChoiceStream. In 2015 Matt was recognized by Digiday as a Signal Award Finalist in Data Management and Marketing, for his work with consumer polling validation.

 

Is Addressable TV Right for Me?

Is Addressable TV Right for Me?

Many DataHub Members are currently advertising on TV and may be curious about the why and how of Addressable TV. When the rumbles of Addressable began, we set out to establish partnerships across the landscape and explore how we could deliver value to our Members in a space poised for growth. After all, we aim to deliver our predictive and high performing audiences in every channel – and television is no exception. 2019 was a year full of relationship-building across platforms, MVPD’s (not up on the lingo? – here is a quick guide), and agencies, so that in 2020 we would be ready to strategically bring this channel to our partners.

Recently we’ve had the opportunity to speak with DataHub Members about expanding their usage of Alliant Audiences into Addressable TV. Throughout these discussions we have uncovered many parallel questions and concerns about scale, delivery and value – all challenges that are meaningful to share with our greater Member community as we navigate this new channel together.

Target TV Audiences at Scale

For the purpose of these conversations, Addressable TV refers to the use of audience targeting in traditional Linear TV. Addressable TV campaigns identify an audience of viewers and deliver targeted television ads at the household level, matched to the subscriber base of a cable or satellite TV service, such as Xfinity or DirectTV. According to the 2019 IAB Advanced TV Targeting Guide, of the 95 million US households with paid TV subscriptions, over 64 million are already capable of addressable targeting. That means more than half of all US households can be reached with specific messaging on the TV shows they watch every day.

Benefits of Addressable TV

Addressable TV makes buying TV advertising better. Linear TV targeting has long leaned on programming and dayparts as a proxy for audience. Despite the flaws, Nielsen panel-based data has been king, and advertisers choose the audience based on what program they watch – 65+ watches Wheel of Fortune or daytime TV. Addressable TV on the other hand allows you to overlay the same targeted audiences you leverage for Direct Mail, Programmatic or Facebook campaigns with traditional programming.

Performing a cost analysis of the audience is important. As a seasoned TV advertiser, you may be accustomed to thinking about scale and value in a particular way, addressable will require a shift in mindset. Your audience may go from 10 million viewers to 5 million, but that subset will be a much more valuable and targeted audience, which may come at a premium price. You can still target 65+, but perhaps you want to target dog owners, not cat owners, in that age bracket. That is an audience that will bring the best results for your TV budget. An additional benefit: you can measure outcome-based metrics at the household level for how that audience performed.

Ready to explore?

Like everything new in marketing – start with a test. A budget estimate to provide an audience large enough to measure performance without overextending would be an investment of at least $500,000. If a test like this falls within your TV budget, the next, and perhaps more perplexing, component is tackling execution.

Many TV advertisers already partner with an agency — consider maintaining this relationship and coordinating a test through them. Their connections and experience within the channel may be invaluable. Don’t work with an agency? You can go directly to the MVPD’s (cable or satellite providers) or consider consortiums. The consortiums, such as Xandr or Ampersand, allow access to multiple MVPD’s with one contact. While the variety and scale of their offerings may be enticing, you may lack the level of control and transparency you desire for a test compared to a direct relationship.

Remember – Audience-First

Don’t forget your audience-first strategy. It is, after all, what makes addressable, addressable! Not only should you feel confident relying on a performance-based audience from the Alliant DataHub, but the team has established a great network that our Members can use to their benefit. We have established TV partnerships with all major MVPD’s, the consortiums, and we are building our TV Agency relationships. Additionally, Alliant’s audiences are being leveraged in Addressable TV by brands such as CVS and Minted.

Don’t forget your audience-first strategy. It is after all what makes addressable, addressable!

Want to test the waters before a full commitment? We can push your desired audience to the MVPDs for an “overlap” test to determine the targetable size on each partner – which is required for pricing. Whatever path you choose, the Alliant team is here to help you navigate Addressable TV.

Reach out and let’s chat Addressable TV!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 Chris Morse, Director, Digital Partnerships

As Manager of Digital Partnerships at Alliant, Chris cultivates relationships with digital platforms to ensure the accessibility and advancement of Alliant’s audiences. After graduating from Western Connecticut State University, Chris began his career on Alliant’s Sales & Marketing team, where he developed insight into the evolving data needs of the fast-growing digital targeting ecosystem. Chris is an avid traveler and has visited three state parks this year on his quest to explore them all.

The Programmatic Alphabet Starts with DSP

The Programmatic Alphabet Starts with DSP

Editor’s Note: Many DataHub Members are well on the road to digital marketing success. For those of you just starting down the path, this primer will give you the ‘ABCs’ you need to get started.

The Players

The Programmatic Marketing world is full of acronyms, but one of the most important to any modern marketer is DSP, or Demand Side Platform.

A DSP is an automated buying tool. Advertisers and agencies use them to purchase digital ad inventory from across the web. Ad inventory, in most cases, means banner ads on websites, mobile ads on apps and the mobile web and in-stream video on a website. DSPs are integrated into multiple ad exchanges and Supply Side Platforms (SSPs). SSPs work as a real-time auctioneer, managing inventory for publishers to help them monetize efficiently, and to traffic the ads for placement on publisher sites.

Running multiple “tactics” is common, and can be set up within each campaign. Campaigns should never be “set and forget”.

Note that DSPs do not service closed platforms like Amazon, Facebook and other “Walled Gardens”. Currently, impressions on these sites are only available through their proprietary tools.

The Process

If you don’t already have a DSP partner, selecting the right fit is an important first step.  Considerations include: inventory, technology and speed, reporting and analytics, data security, pricing and support. Once you have the right partner, the campaign planner, logs onto the DSP account online and defines the targeting parameters based on campaign goals. Typical campaign parameters may include:

Campaign type –  Branding or Performance

Device –Mobile or Desktop

Type – Display or Instream Video

Ad Unit Format – Native, cross screen, video and a variety of sizes – See Industry Standards

Budget Amount – Scale based on campaign goals and progression

Pricing Options – CPM vs. CPA

Inventory Targeting – Categories of sites or specific names

Audience Targeting – 1st, 2nd or 3rd Party Data: focus on your customer or visitor data, target a partner’s set of customers, or harness thousands of audience segments available for targeting.

Time of Day – CPMs change every second but trend based on general web activity

Geography – Narrow in on the location of your target audience

Frequency Cap – Limit the # times an individual sees an ad

Brand Safety – Define sites with black listed content

Contextual Constraints – Set parameters to ensure relevancy

Strategy comes with experience. Running multiple “tactics” is common, and can be set up within each campaign. Campaigns should never be “set and forget”.  Your learnings can be realized daily — if not hourly — and adjusted per your campaign goals.

The programmatic ecosystem is a crucial part of any marketer’s strategy. Whether your team is experienced in targeting through major DSPs, or just getting started, the audiences you need are out there, and the managed service teams at any major provider can point you in the right direction. Alliant’s Digital Help Desk  is available 24/7 to answer any questions you have about our digital audiences and how you can build your next successful digital campaign with them.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Matt Frattaroli, VP Digital Platforms & Agencies

With over a decade of experience in adtech and eCommerce, Matt leads Alliant’s digital team in expanding strategic partnerships with the industry’s largest digital platforms and agencies. Matt’s professional roots are deep in the digital marketing space, having built multiple eCommerce and MarTech companies, including ChoiceStream. In 2015 Matt was recognized by Digiday as a Signal Award Finalist in Data Management and Marketing, for his work with consumer polling validation.